A Woman's Work | The Refuge, Manchester.

8th March – 30th June, 2022

Tish Murtha

Part one of ‘A Woman’s Work’ features iconic social documentary photography from Tish Murtha (14th March 1956 – 13th March 2013).

One of the most pre-eminent British documentary photographers of the post-war era, Tish was known for capturing social change and everyday life on the fringes of society. 

This is the first time Tish Murtha’s work has been exhibited in Manchester. The images on display are some of the most powerful images of British social photography of the last 50 years.

Exhibition Gallery | Tish Murtha

Follow the Tish Murtha gallery along The Refuge wall from right to left. 

Elswick kids, 1978.
1. Elswick Kids, 1978.
Girls Skipping by Tish Murtha
2. Girls Skipping from the series Elswick Kids (1978)
SuperMac by Tish Murtha
3. SuperMac. From the series Elswick Kids, 1978.
Mala and Sue by Tish Murtha
4. Mala and Sue. From the series Elswick Kids, 1978.
Richard and Louise by Tish Murtha
5. Richard and Louise. From the series Elswick Kids, 1978.
Heather and Mam by Tish Murtha
6. Heather and Mam. From the series Juvenile Jazz Bands (1979)
Kenilworth Road Kids by Tish Murtha Print
7. Kenilworth Road Kids. From the series Juvenile Jazz Bands (1979)
Kids Jumping onto Mattresses by Tish Murtha Print
8. Tish Murtha's Iconic - Kids Jumping onto Mattresses. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Carl on Eileen's Couch by Tish Murtha Print
9. Carl on Eileen's Couch. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Statues by Tish Murtha Print
10. Statues. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Glenn on the wall by Tish Murtha
11. Glenn on the wall. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Karen on an Overturned chair by TIsh Murtha
12. Karen on an overturned chair. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Cardsharps by Tish Murtha
13. Cardsharps. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Glenn and Paul on the washing line Tish Murtha Print
14. Glenn and Paul on the washing line. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Cops Piss Off Tish Murtha
15. Cops Piss Off. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)
Tish Murtha Glenn In the Window Newcastle Print
17. Glenn in the window. From the series Youth Unemployment (1981)

Anne Worthington

Also on display is the work of photographer Anne Worthington. Anne produced an incredible body of work documenting the inner city communities of East Manchester in the late 1990s and early 2000s before the regeneration of the area. 

Anne “I took these photographs in Beswick, Clayton and Openshaw, three areas of industrial East Manchester. Areas that had employed thousands of people and very little remained. The streets housed a fraction of the people who used to live there. Like other parts of the UK, it’s a well trodden story.”

“The collapse of industry made this area one of the poorest in the city. East Manchester ended up being earmarked for regeneration, and by the time I started to take photographs here, streets in Beswick and Openshaw had been emptied and made ready for demolition. I’d meet people living in the one house still occupied in otherwise empty streets. Kids would take over those streets and walls got smashed in and fires lit in the empty houses. I got to know a family who’d started a club for young people to give them something else to do. They’d check on the kids most nights, the ones who were still out late into the night because some of them didn’t have stable places to call home. They opened their homes and gave them somewhere to stay”

“I met people down streets and on steps, and got more known as the photographer. It could be a tough place, sometimes a dark place, but rarely unhappy. People had a sense of purpose. They saw something wasn’t right and took it on. They’d been keeping their community going when other institutions had fallen away. And they knew how to have fun.”

“I got to know a few families and saw what can be overcome with that sense of belonging. Times have changed since I was there in the late 90’s and early part of the 2000’s. Some of the streets aren’t there now, kids were outside a lot then, and the clothes were different.”

Some people in the photographs still live in the area, they’ve married, grown up, got older. Some of them have died. The regeneration scheme came and went, the new houses were built, and the areas have changed. They are distinct from the rest of the city, still dislocated maybe, and the people are still kind, enduring, wise and angry.”

 

Exhibition Gallery | Anne Worthington

God's Dice.
1. God's Dice. Beswick, 2000. Photo © Anne Worthington
Photos of East Manchester 2000 Anne Worthington 17
2. Beswick 4 Life. Tanker + Jamo. Beswick, 2002. Photo © Anne Worthington
Walkway kids. Penfair Close, Beswick, 2001.
3. Walkway kids. Penfair Close, Beswick, 2001. Photo © Anne Worthington
Council Not Welcome Here. Beswick, 2001.
4. Council Not Welcome Here. Beswick, 2001. Photo © Anne Worthington
Near Claribel Street. Beswick, 2000.
5. Near Claribel Street. Beswick, 2000. Photo © Anne Worthington
Photo of Clayton, Manchester, 2000.
6. Clayton, Manchester, 2000. Photo © Anne Worthington
Denise, Becky and Kipper. Openshaw, 2002.
7. Denise, Becky and Kipper. Openshaw, 2002. Photo © Anne Worthington
Photo of Clayton, Manchester, 2000.
8. Clayton, Manchester, 2000. Photo © Anne Worthington
9. Dolly and the kids. Chariot St. Openshaw 2002. Photo © Anne Worthington
Walkway kids. Grey Mare Lane, Beswick, 2001.
10. Walkway kids. Grey Mare Lane, Beswick, 2001. Photo © Anne Worthington
A Woman’s Work
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap