I stumbled across these photos by the late photographer Iain S. P. Reid about a year ago or so. Not much is known about Iain except that he was a photographer with a special love for Manchester and the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, who sadly passed away in 2000.

The photos date from around 1977 and feature mainly young fans attending home matches at Old Trafford and Maine Road.

I’ve recently shared some of his images on our Instagram and Facebook pages and they have stirred up some nostalgic memories about the football culture of previous decades, long before Sky TV and big money takeovers.

The majority of Iain’s images have not been seen by many, hopefully they can now be appreciated  by a wider audience.

 

 

All images by Iain S. P. Reid. Iain Reid Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/IainSPReid

 

Article by Paul Wright. http://www.twitter.com/mrpaulwright

 

2018 © British Culture Archive.

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Manchester’s Northern Quarter has developed rapidly over the years, a sizemic shift from a gloomy forgotten part of the city to pretty much a tourist destination in its own right. A sprawling epicentre of counter culture and street art, a new bar, restaurant or boutique shop seems to open its doors at least once a fortnight.

Back in the mid eighties however it was a different story, the majority of hipsters who now spend their weekends shopping, eating and drinking here were yet to be born and mobile phones were basically breeze blocks with aerials.

Our gallery below transports us back these times, when pet shops, appliance centres and saunas were king, and these now fashionable streets and pavements were much less trodden.

Manchester’s (Pre) Northern Quarter, 1985.

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Oldham Street, at the crossroads with Hilton Street, 1985.
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Oldham Street facing up towards The Castle Hotel, 1985.
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Tib Street, facing up towards Great Ancoats Street, 1985.
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Junction of Hilton Street and Tib Street, 1985.
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Blacks Sauna Club/Domestic Appliance Centre, Tib Street, 1985.
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Blacks Sauna Club/Domestic Appliance Centre and The Record Bar, Tib Street, 1985.
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Tib Street and Brightwell Walk social housing, 1985.
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Tib Street and Brightwell Walk social housing, 1985.
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The facade of The Smithfield fish market in the shadows of The Co-Operative Insurance Society building (CIS) 1985.
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A young couple enjoy a stroll by Manchester Craft Village, 1985.
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The King, Oldham Street and Tib Street entrances, 1985.
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Fish & Chips and a green Lada outside Manchester Craft Village, 1985.
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Tib Street, facing towards High Street, 1985.

All pictures © Manchester Archives+

Article by Paul Wright http://www.twitter.com/mrpaulwright

2018 © British Culture Archive

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The Blackburn Warehouse Parties of 1989-1990 started off as a handful of likeminded friends and associates, who disenchanted by the lack of scene in their hometown decided to put on their own nights in disused warehouses and industrial units.

Initially outwitting local authority the events were promoted to people ‘in the know’ via word of mouth, flyers were given out with a contact number to be called for rendezvous points and further instructions, often meeting in distant towns and cities (Manchester’s Konspiracy nightclub being one) then travelling en masse in convoy consisting of Vauxhall Nova’s, Fiesta XR2’s and Escort XR3i’s (amongst other classic models favoured by the youth of the era) across to the various industrial estates around Blackburn. The parties rapidly ballooned from a couple of hundred local kids to thousands of revellers from the satellite towns of the North West and beyond.

The early raves were a success and predominantly trouble free, however as the scale of the events got bigger so did the pressure on the Lancashire Police Force to get the parties shut down, police presence increased and a number of arrests were made. One of the last big events was ‘Live The Dream’ in Tockholes, an all-nighter that took place on 16th/17th September 1989, which saw in excess of  10000 people from all over the UK attend.

Our gallery below takes you back to these times and provides an insight into this magical and non-pretentious early era of dance music and rave culture that went onto inspire a generation of club promotors, musicians and DJs alike.

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Glenfield Park Industrial Estate, Blackburn. 1989.
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The morning after, waiting for a lift. Whitebirk roundabout, 1990.
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The convoys start arriving at Live The Dream, Tockholes, September 16th, 1989.
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Eddie Maxwell from Blackburn at the Edenfield rave, 6th August, 1989.
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Shaun Cannon from Darwen at Edenfield, 6th August, 1989.
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Leaving the Altham warehouse after an all-nighter. 12th February, 1990.
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Police on the scene Altham Warehouse, 12th February, 1990.
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Police talk with ravers at Altham warehouse, 12th February, 1990.
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Convoy heading to Tony’s Empress Ballroom. 25th March, 1990.
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Convoy heading to Tony’s Empress Ballroom. 25th March, 1990.
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Live the dream Tockholes, 16th September 1989.
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Kick out time. Tony’s Empress Ballroom, 25th March 1990.
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Reel Hedz Presents. Flyer for Live The Dream with telephone number to call for instructions on the night.
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The marquee at Live The Dream, Tockholes, 16th September,1989.
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Live The Dream, Tockholes, 16th September, 1989.

All photo’s © Lancashire Evening Post.

Article by Paul Wright http://www.twitter.com/mrpaulwright

2018 © British Culture Archive

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I was in contact with the now Derbyshire based photographer Robin Weaver recently and he introduced me to a brilliant collection of images that were taken during his time as a reporter for a local newspaper in South Wales during the 1970’s.

Aside from taking the usual press shots of rugby matches, mayors visits and the occasional flower show, he particularly enjoyed spending his spare time documenting the lives of the everyday Welsh people in and around the South Wales valleys and towns.

The images below are just a selection of Robins photographs that capture a different time in Welsh Culture, long before sophisticated computers, mobile phones and on-demand television. These photos take us back to what now seems like ‘a different country’ which is the title of Robins book showcasing his work from that era.

A Different Country

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All images © Robin Weaver http://www.twitter.com/RWeaverPhotos

A limited number of these books are currently available from http://www.blurb.co.uk/b/6037163-a-different-country

Article by Paul Wright http://www.twitter.com/mrpaulwright

2018 © British Culture Archive

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